On-U Sound is an iconic independent label with a treasure trove of remarkable music, and sits in a unique position historically as a junction point between the heavy influence of Jamaican music on UK culture and the development of disparate sounds such as post-punk, hip-hop, industrial, jungle, dubstep and beyond.

The label emerged from a fertile UK DIY scene that birthed contemporary imprints such as Rough Trade, 4AD and Factory.  Since 1981, with label boss and producer Adrian Sherwood at the helm, On-U Sound has released over 100 albums and singles and launched the careers of countless artists.

As a producer, Adrian has worked with The Slits, Cabaret Voltaire, Nine Inch Nails, Ministry, The Fall, Sinead O’Connor and more. His remix credits include Depeche Mode, Afrika Bambaataa, Blur, Primal Scream, Air and Peaking Lights. Massively respected by other musicians, he is an acknowledged influence on the likes of Andrew Weatherall, Carl Craig and Machinedrum.

Key On-U Sound artists include Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry, Tackhead, Dub Syndicate, African Head Charge, New Age Steppers, Singers & Players and Bim Sherman.

In 2015, Adrian continues to be in-demand for his unique sonic vision and this year he has been in the studio with Clinic, Roots Manuva and Nisennenmondai. There is also a major project underway to reissue and reappraise the amazing back catalogue of classic records that have been released on the imprint, which was recently instigated with the release of Sherwood At The Controls Volume 1: 1979 – 1984, a compilation highlighting some crucial early tracks and unreleased gems from the tape vaults, and the exclusive Record Store Day release An On-U Journey Through Time & Space.

“The depth and breadth of Sherwood at the Controls stuns. These songs aren’t just curious footnotes in one man’s extensive discography—a bunch of them legitimately bang, and the ones that don’t go full-bore into left field. Taken together, they give a sense of the indelible mark Sherwood has left, and hopefully there is more on the way to round out the picture.”  – Pitchfork